Author Topic: Is the board really back?  (Read 367 times)

Dammit

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Is the board really back?
« on: September 12, 2020, 08:14:00 PM »
And is it 2021 yet?

buffcoat

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Re: Is the board really back?
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2020, 11:35:47 PM »
I really don't appreciate your sarcastic, anti-comedy tone, Bro!

Krokodil_Gena

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Re: Is the board really back?
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2020, 08:07:44 PM »
And is it 2021 yet?

You have three months to go. While waiting, you can listen to these online software-defined radio sites:

http://69.27.184.62:8901/  <=== KFS SDR in Half Moon Bay, California. Covers 160-80-75-40-20 meter bands.

http://www.sdrutah.org/  <=== The ultimate monster of SDRs in America. North of the Golden Spike Park, covers the following using multiple sites:

2200 meters, amateur, 1750 meters, Part 15 "LowFer" band - The entirety of the 2200 meter (135.7-137.8 kHz), our only LF amateur band, is covered on  the "2200M/1750M" receiver on WebSDR3.

1750 meters, the Part 15 "LowFer" band - (160-190 kHz) is covered on  the "2200M/1750M" receiver on WebSDR3.

630 meters, amateur - The entirety of this, our lowest MF amateur allocation (472.0-479.0 kHz), is covered on WebSDR3 by the "630M" receiver.

AM (medium wave) broadcast - This band is completely covered on WebSDR1 by the "AM-160M-120M" receiver.

160 meters, amateur - The bottom 190+ kHz of this MF band is covered with the "160M" band, and the entirety of this band (the top 8-10 kHz) is also covered by the lower-performance "AM-160M-120M" receiver, both on WebSDR1.

120 meters, SWBC - The 120 meter "tropical" shortwave band is covered on WebSDR1 by the "AM-160M-120M" receiver.

90 meters, SWBC - the 90 meter shortwave band - used for both domestic U.S. and "tropical" service is covered on WebSDR3 by the "90-80M" receiver.

80/75 meters, amateur - This band is covered in its entirety by three receivers with overlapping coverage (e.g. 80CW, 80PH, 75PH) on WebSDR1 along with redundant (albeit lower-performance) coverage via the "90-80M" receiver on WebSDR3.

75 meter, SWBC - This band (3.9-4.0 MHz), used for shortwave broadcasting in the world outside the Americas, is covered by the "75PH" receiver on WebSDR1.

60 meters, SWBC - The 60 meter shortwave broadcast band is covered on WebSDR1 by the "60M-49M" receiver.

60 meters, amateur - The "60M-49M" receiver on WebSDR1 covers all variations of the 60 meter amateur band as allocated by different countries:  The five U.S. 60 meter channels are marked on the spectrum/frequency display.

49 meters, SWBC - The 49 meter shortwave broadcast band is covered on WebSDR1 by the "60M-49M" receiver.

41 meters, SWBC - The 41 meter shortwave broadcast band is covered on WebSDR3 by the "41-40M" receiver.

40 meters, amateur - This band is covered in its entirety by the overlapping "40CW" and "40PH" band receivers on WebSDR1 1 along with redundant (albeit lower-performance) coverage via the "41-40M" receiver on WebSDR3.

31 meters, SWBC - The 31 meter shortwave broadcast band is covered by the "31M-30M" receiver on WebSDR2.

30 meters, amateur - The 30 meter amateur band is covered in its entirety by the "31M-30M" receiver on WebSDR2.

25 meters, SWBC - The 25 meter shortwave broadcast band is covered by the "25M SWBC" receiver on WebSDR3.

20 meters, amateur - This band is covered in its entirety by the overlapping "20CW" and "20PH" band receivers on WebSDR2.

19 meters, SWBC - The 19 meter shortwave broadcast band (and Canadian time station CHU at 14670 kHz) is covered by the "19M SWBC" receiver on WebSDR3.

17 meters, amateur - This band is covered in its entirety by the "17M" receiver on WebSDR2.

15 meters, amateur - This band is covered in its entirety by the "15M-13M" receiver on WebSDR2.

13 meters, SWBC - This band is covered by the "15M-13M" receiver on WebSDR2.

12 meters, amateur - Approximately 96% of this band is covered by the "12M" receiver on WebSDR2.  Only the top and bottom 2-3 kHz are missing.

10 meters, amateur - This band is covered in its entirety by the "10M" receiver on WebSDR2.

6 meters, amateur - The bottom 1 MHz (approximately) is covered by the "6M" receiver on WebSDR2.

2 meters, amateur - This band is covered in its entirety by two overlapping receivers, "2M Low" and "2M High" on WebSDR3.

http://na5b.com:8901/  <=== Washington D.C.- based SDR. Runs from AM band and 160m to 10m band plus 11m Citizen's Band. Band sections are so large you get overlap from ham bands to regular shortwave like 40m to the 42m commercial shortwave band.

http://w7rna.dyndns-remote.com:8901/  <=== Sedona, Arizona-based SDR.  Covers everything the KFS SDR does, plus 30m data/Morse code band, and all of the commercial shortwave bands: 60m, 49m, 41m, 31m, 25m.

fonpr

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Re: Is the board really back?
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2020, 08:11:06 AM »
If one were to pick just one of the above links, Krok, which one would you recommend?
"Like it or not, Florida seems dedicated to a 'live fast, die' way of doing things."

Krokodil_Gena

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Re: Is the board really back?
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2020, 04:51:08 AM »
If one were to pick just one of the above links, Krok, which one would you recommend?

It's where you want to go....if you want to just hear East Coast AM and shortwave, the NA5B is a good starter. If you want good coverage of general shortwave in one website, the Sedona SDR is a good starter. The Utah SDR is useful for fringe coverage of ham radio activity on the West Coast. Mostly what you will hear, if it isn't data transmissions, encypted SELCAN transmission from military bases, or the World Clock, will be commercial shortwave stations and amateur radio operators, the latter mostly in sideband.