Author Topic: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips  (Read 9534 times)

Dorvid Barnas

  • Guest
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2007, 05:15:24 PM »
This was the best movie I've seen in a long long time.
I'm going to see it again tomorrow night.


dave from knoxville

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 5108
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2007, 10:00:27 AM »
On a scale from 1-10 of movie violence, with 10 being the most violent, what would you rank it? My very literate (despite his radio show call-in to the contrary) 15 year old Andy From Knoxville wants to see it. My policy has been that if it's exceptional art, I can tolerate some adult situations, thus he's seen The Usual Suspects. What kind of ground am I on here?

bruce

  • Guest
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2007, 10:11:19 AM »
well Dave from what I heard it follows the book. So expect it to be about a 10

Dorvid Barnas

  • Guest
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2007, 10:49:24 AM »
On a scale from 1-10 of movie violence, with 10 being the most violent, what would you rank it? My very literate (despite his radio show call-in to the contrary) 15 year old Andy From Knoxville wants to see it. My policy has been that if it's exceptional art, I can tolerate some adult situations, thus he's seen The Usual Suspects. What kind of ground am I on here?

9.  It's more violent than Fargo and much more so than The Usual Suspects
Would I let my 15 year old see it?  Probably, but not knowing what other R movies AFK has seen, I'd recommend seeing it yourself before making the call.

If you wouldn't let him watch Silence of the Lambs or Saving Private Ryan, you won't want him to see this.


Chris L

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 2780
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2007, 02:40:59 PM »
Yup, it's great.

Fido

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 1017
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2007, 10:50:10 PM »
Quote
Guy Pearce has already been cast as the Father

Really? When I was reading the book, I was imagining someone a lot older. Maybe that's because I'd read that the book was about McCarthy's relationship with his own son.

Originally they were talking to Viggo Mortensen but I guess that ain't happenin.' Andy Milonakis has already been cast as the son. 
Brilliant casting decision on Andy Milonakis!!!   A better decision couldn't have been made.  There was no other choice, really.

Andy

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 6112
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2007, 10:55:55 PM »
does this open wide on Wednesday?  I was so pissed when I couldn't see it this weekend.
Breakfast- I'm havin' a time
Wheelies- I'm havin' a time
Headlocks- I'm havin' a time
Drunk Tank- not so much a time
George St.- I'm havin' a time
Brenda- I'm havin' a time
Bingo- I'm havin' a time
House Arrest- I'm still havin' a time

dave from knoxville

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 5108
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #22 on: November 20, 2007, 10:32:16 AM »
We named Andy From Knoxville after Andy Milonakis.

masterofsparks

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 3323
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #23 on: November 24, 2007, 11:31:57 PM »
Joel & Ethan Coen, Josh Brolin, and Javier Bardem being interviewed by Charlie Rose:

http://bigscreenlittlescreen.net/2007/11/22/video-charlie-rose-and-the-coen-brothers-on-no-country/
I'll probably go into the wee hours.

bruce

  • Guest
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2007, 09:06:03 AM »
Greatest laugh i got this past Friday was seeing this film. Once it ended hearing all the What the Hell ending is that in the crowd. I wanted to yell that's how the book ends maybe you should have read it.

the movie was fantastic by the way

masterofsparks

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 3323
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #25 on: November 25, 2007, 09:29:54 AM »
Quote
Greatest laugh i got this past Friday was seeing this film. Once it ended hearing all the What the Hell ending is that in the crowd.

Haha, it was the same thing when I saw it. The screen went to black and there were several "Eh?" "Huh?" "What?" exclamations. On the way out, I heard someone say "I guess that was an art film" in a voice dripping with sarcasm.

I thought it was a great ending, personally. And I have yet to read the book.
I'll probably go into the wee hours.

Shaggy 2 Grote

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 3892
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #26 on: November 25, 2007, 02:08:23 PM »
Yeah, I feel like I have to read the book now.  It started out like a Coen Brothers movie and wound up like a Flannery O'Connor story.  What I loved so much was how the Coen Brothers knowingly subverted not only genre conventions, but the conventions of other Coen Brothers movies - everything I had come to expect from seeing every one of their other movies was deliberately defied.

I stayed up until three o'clock this morning talking about different interpretations of the Javier Bardem character and his relation to Tommy Lee Jones.  My friend Danny made a convincing case that he represented the invisible hand of the marketplace, i.e., the violence that underlies the capitalist economy, and that he punished anyone who tried to keep money out of circulation.  My wife thinks he's death.  I tend to look at it as sort of a Buddhist interpretation: that Bardem is inevitable suffering that can neither be defined nor avoided, and the only way to be spared by him is by letting go of earthly attachments - some of those being money or pride, but in the end even the pursuit of justice or safety.  What's so great about all of these interpretations is that they all work to a point but eventually they all fall short - the movie both invites and defies interpretation.
Oh, good heavens. I didnít realize. I send my condolences out to the rest of the OíConnor family.

Chris L

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 2780
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #27 on: November 25, 2007, 03:55:18 PM »
My friend Danny made a convincing case that he represented the invisible hand of the marketplace, i.e., the violence that underlies the capitalist economy, and that he punished anyone who tried to keep money out of circulation.

I like that interpretation.  Listening to TLJ's description of his dream at the end, it sounds like a premonition of McCarthy's The Road, with the father and son "carrying fire in a horn," and the father riding ahead of the son into the darkness. In that context, Chigurh can be seen as an herald of the apocalypse.

Shaggy 2 Grote

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 3892
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #28 on: November 25, 2007, 04:24:41 PM »
Yeah, Chris L - he took a long, long time to convince me, as he's been reading Lewis Hyde's The Gift and viewing everything from the point-of-view of the gift economy (and I should add that I still don't buy it 100%, as I think the story defies any kind of easy interpretation).  The one thing that made me stop short was the scene with the accountant in Dallas or wherever that was: "are you going to kill me?"  "It depends.  Can you see me?"  The invisible hand interpretation really works in that scene.
Oh, good heavens. I didnít realize. I send my condolences out to the rest of the OíConnor family.

Josh

  • Space Champion!
  • Posts: 1384
Re: No Country For Old Men Movie Clips
« Reply #29 on: November 25, 2007, 07:38:25 PM »
My friend Danny made a convincing case that he represented the invisible hand of the marketplace, i.e., the violence that underlies the capitalist economy, and that he punished anyone who tried to keep money out of circulation.

Can you explain that further? Does your friend think that Llewelyn would have hid the money under his bed permanently?


There's a part in the book when the sheriff says:
Quote
There is no such thing as a county law. You think about a job where you have pretty much the same authority as God and there is no requirements put upon you and you are charged with preservin nonexistent laws and you tell me if that's peculiar or not. Because I say that it is. Does it work? Yes. Ninety percent of the time. It takes very little to govern good people. Very little. And bad people cant be governed at all. Or if they could I never heard of it.

I think this sets Chiguh up as sheriff of the ungovernable, enforcing his own notion of fairness, and with the same disregard for the governable that Sheriff Bell has for the ungovernable.


Edited for grammar and spelling.
"Alright, well, for the sake of this conversation, let's say the book does not exist."